Musée d'Art Contemporain

The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal

The first institution in Canada to be exclusively devoted to contemporary art, the Musée presents temporary exhibitions of works by Québecois, Canadian and international artists. It also holds a rich permanent collection bringing together nearly 7,600 works, among them the world’s biggest collection of works by Paul-Émile Borduas.

The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal was founded by the Québec government in 1964, at the instigation of artists and collectors who wanted to see an institution established to build a collection of contemporary works by artists from Montréal, Québec, Canada and around the world.

Supported by its education and documentation department, the Musée offers a range of educational activities to introduce the general public to contemporary art. As well, the Musée presents many multimedia creations—performances, contemporary music, video and film—confirming its mandate to disseminate contemporary art.

The Musée sits west of the Place des Arts Esplanade, facing the Place des Festivals. It is part of the broader Québecois and Canadian cultural complex, where the performing arts rub shoulders with the visual arts. The building’s roof showcases a large-scale representation of a mouth, a photographic work by artist Geneviève Cadieux entitled La voie lactée.